How to Gain an Edge over the Blues

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A friend recently experienced the death of his 5 year old male Manchester terrier. His dog was hit by a passing vehicle as he stood by helplessly watching. He thinks the hardest part was not blaming himself, the driver, or God. He picked up his little friend off the asphalt, holding him very close, and kept telling him “You’re okay boy, you’re going to be okay.” Well, he wasn’t okay, and he died in his arms. He suffered very little, if any at all. Six months has passed, and not a day goes by that he doesn’t miss him. In fact, not a week goes without him crying over his loss.

Does this mean he is depressed? Is this an example of pathological grief? The answer is no to both questions, it’s a normal response to one of life’s difficult experiences. It’s part of being human. His situation has been explained to me as a case of the blues. How do you gain an edge over the blues? In his case, acceptance gave him the edge. Can a situation like his progress to depression? I’m sure it could, depression can be triggered by a number of life’s experiences.

What You Should Know

You should know that depression affects more than 18 million adults in the United States every year. You should also know depression is a complex medical and psychological condition with a number of causes we don’t fully understand. What research has shown is that by managing our reaction to stress, we can manage our brain chemistry so that we can relieve depression.

Managing your brain chemistry and relieving your depression is the essence of my Gender Brain Science™ program. When you embrace my program and nurture it, you open the door for an entirely new way of experiencing your relationships at a more intimate level.

Yes, neurotransmitters like serotonin in women and dopamine in men have been identified as major contributors to our emotional well being. But hormones also have a role in the complex nature of our brain chemistry. There are also structural differences in the male and female brain that effect our emotions, sex drive, physical activity, and gender responses to stress.

What’s the Bottom Line?

The bottom line is scientists and doctors know very little about the biological causes of depression. What is understood is the importance of an individual’s brain chemistry which can, and does, affect our emotional well being. Neurotransmitters and hormones are made up of complex proteins humans produce by nature of what we feed our body.

Gender Brain Science™ is a program that promotes the type of nutrition that supports synthesis, or production, of the essential complex proteins our bodies require. In addition to nutrition, Gender Brain Science™ offers complementary medically accepted methods for enhancing calmness and well-being. As you know, it’s almost impossible to be depressed when you are in a calm state and your body is functioning optimally.

Good healthy food, a well-exercised body, and a calm mind all contribute to giving you an edge over the negative effects of depression. Namely, the inability to bounce back from one of life’s unexpected tragedies, sleep disturbances, chronic fatigue, and the loss of your zest for life. It’s not necessary to live with the feelings of hopelessness, constant battles with weight, and sadness.

My name is Beverly Taylor, and I am a gender brain chemistry expert. Let me help you to be all that you can be through optimizing your brain chemistry. Get a free ebook here and start on your path to mastering your destiny through mastering your brain chemistry : http://bit.ly/BluesOptin

Nothing in this program is meant to be considered medical, psychological or nutritional advice. Contact those professionals for that type of advice. I do not diagnose nor treat psychological disorders. I am not a licensed practitioner, rather I am a Certified Consulting Hypnotist. This information and training contains only educational content for wellness. If you are under 18, you must have your parent or guardian approval to be in the class. If you are in an urgent situation, call 911 or call the Suicide Hotline at 800-273-8255, which is available 24/7 and is free.